Title

David O. McKay's Progressive Educational Ideas and Practices, 1899—1922

Keywords

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Teachers, Religious buildings, Boards of education, Mormon history, Oral history, Teacher education, History instruction, Public schools, Theology

Abstract

Before Americans were exposed to the common school move ment of the twentieth century, it was commonly believed that proper nourishment was the only need children had.1 Horace Mann, John Dewey, and other leading progressives promoted the philosophy that proper education was another basic need for a successful adult life. Progressives believed that children needed to be exposed to schooling where they could have "experience."2 Progressive educators emphasized that "true education was centered on activity, which in turn promoted the growth of character." In addition, for a child to grow correctly, he or she needed to be viewed as a "free personality" capable of charting his or her own destiny.

Original Publication Citation

Woodger, Mary Jane, “David O. McKay’s Progressive Educational Ideas and Practices, 1899-1922,” Journal of the Mormon History Association. Lavina Fielding Anderson, ed., no. 2, (Fall, 2004) 30: 208-248.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2004-9

Publisher

Journal of Mormon History

Language

english

College

Religious Education

Department

Church History and Doctrine

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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