Abstract

Telemetric observations were conducted on a pair of Sharp-Shinned Hawks (Accipiter striatus velox) nesting in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah in 1972. The movements of both adults were monitored from the time their eggs hatched in late June until they left the study area in early August, fourty-two days later. A transmitter was also attached to one of the young at the time of fledging. The adult's main hunting area was a single plant community located 1600 meters from the nest. The male performed the majority of the foraging while the female spent the greatest part of her time at the nest. Information on sixty-one Sharp-shinned Hawk nests in Utah was analyzed. The typical nest site was determined as being a small stand of coniferous trees present in a deciduous tree community. Sharp-shinned Hawks in southern Utah began nesting activities up to twenty days before the same species 350 miles away in northern Utah. Thirty-four nests averaged a clutch size of 4.3 eggs.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1973-07-25

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd271

Keywords

Hawks

Language

English

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