Abstract

This study is a history of a group of Latter-day Saints who travelled from Kirtland, Ohio to Adam-ondi-Ahman, Caldwell County, Missouri during the late summer and early autumn, 1838. The group numbered between five and six hundred when they left Kirtland and had diminished to approximately half that many at the end of their journey.

The official name, "Kirtland Camp," was adopted by the group which was originally founded and governed by seven men, i.e. the Seventies Presidency in Kirtland.

The camp was organized to assist Church members who otherwise would have been unable to escape persecutions in Ohio. Camp membership consisted of those who were elderly, infirm or lacking necessary finances to flee by themselves. Although sickness, death and dissension plagued the camp members during their exodus, faith, determination and able leadership contributed to the successful completion of the trek.

The formulation of Kirtland Camp and the unique nature of its Camp Constitution became the pattern for the organization of later Mormon pioneer exiles under Brigham Young.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1975

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm337

Keywords

Mormon pioneers, Frontier, pioneer life, Mormon Church, Ohio, History, Missouri

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