Keywords

participatory modeling, method selection process

Start Date

25-6-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

25-6-2018 10:20 AM

Abstract

The popularity of ‘participatory modeling’ (PM) approaches to environmental modeling has grown in recent years, however, there remains limited literature about how participatory modelers select from a range of a growing number of PM methods. We surveyed PM modelers to explore the factors that influence their selection of PM methods. Our survey draws on a typology that outlines five categories of PM methods: fact finding, process orchestration, qualitative modeling, semi-quantitative modeling, and quantitative modeling. Results from our survey (N=84) suggest three main findings: 1) the comfort level of respondents for a given PM method is the highest for ‘fact finding’ and ‘process orchestration’ methods but the lowest for more quantitative methods; 2) time, level of stakeholder involvement, prior experience, and money are the most important factors when selecting a method, while the least important factors are participants' skill/education level and data availability; and 3) respondents typically select methods based on the nature of the problem they are studying, yet also tend to favor methods with which they are most familiar.

Stream and Session

Stream C: Integrated Social, Economic, Ecological, and Infrastructural Modeling

Session C5: Participatory Modelling 2.0: Interfaces, Tools, Methods and Approaches for Linking Stakeholders Decisions, and Environmental Modelling

COinS
 
Jun 25th, 9:00 AM Jun 25th, 10:20 AM

Method Selection in Participatory Modeling: A Survey of Practitioners

The popularity of ‘participatory modeling’ (PM) approaches to environmental modeling has grown in recent years, however, there remains limited literature about how participatory modelers select from a range of a growing number of PM methods. We surveyed PM modelers to explore the factors that influence their selection of PM methods. Our survey draws on a typology that outlines five categories of PM methods: fact finding, process orchestration, qualitative modeling, semi-quantitative modeling, and quantitative modeling. Results from our survey (N=84) suggest three main findings: 1) the comfort level of respondents for a given PM method is the highest for ‘fact finding’ and ‘process orchestration’ methods but the lowest for more quantitative methods; 2) time, level of stakeholder involvement, prior experience, and money are the most important factors when selecting a method, while the least important factors are participants' skill/education level and data availability; and 3) respondents typically select methods based on the nature of the problem they are studying, yet also tend to favor methods with which they are most familiar.