Keywords

study, distance learners, feedback, secondary students

Abstract

This study explores the effects of immediate and delayed feedback for 2 noncohort groups of high school students enrolled in distance learning courses at Brigham Young University. One group received immediate feedback while the second group received delayed feedback. Those students receiving immediate feedback performed significantly better on final exams, but those who received delayed feedback completed courses in significantly less time. The findings promise to inform best practices for providing feedback to secondary students in a distance learning setting and also give cause for further research.

Original Publication Citation

Lemley, D., Sudweeks, R., Howell, S., Laws, D., and Sawyer, O. (Fall 2007). The effects of immediate and delayed feedback on secondary distance learners. Quarterly Review of Distance Education,8(3), 251–260. (Recipient of UCEA Elizabeth Powell Award for best paper published with most significant contribution to distance education. Awarded at UCEA conference, May, 2008.)

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2007

Publisher

Information Age Publishing

Language

English

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Department

Instructional Psychology and Technology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Associate Professor

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