Keywords

teaching, lessons, technology and engineering literacy

Abstract

While written lesson plans may seem like a lot of work, with little purpose or benefit to new teachers, a well-written lesson plan is quite valuable for many reasons. The process of writing lesson plans at the beginning of one’s teaching career can be very time-consuming (Arnett-Hartwick and Cannon, 2019); however, the development of sequenced lessons that result in effective learning must be organized and articulate, not done haphazardly. Designing a lesson through a written document can help a teacher see the pattern, flow, and implications of a lesson and how it will help all students; this can be especially true when considering the needs of exceptional and English or Exceptional Language Learners. Further, stakeholders within the school system (principal, curriculum director, department head, and district supervisor) may require written units and weekly or even daily lesson plans for the purposes of teacher evaluation, feedback, accountability, or in-service training.

Original Publication Citation

Bartholomew, S. R., Loveland, T., & Santana, V. (2020). Writing standards-based lesson plans to Standards for Technological and Engineering Literacy. Technology & Engineering Teacher, 80(3), 24-29.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020-11

Publisher

Technology & Engineering Teacher

Language

English

College

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering

Department

Technology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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