Keywords

evaluation research, human patient simulation, nursing education, simulation effectiveness

Abstract

Background: There has been a lack of reliable and valid instruments measuring human patient simulation effectiveness reported in the literature. Two related studies addressing this concern are described.

Methods: A multi-phased pilot investigation at a single nursing program (N=161) and a follow-up multi-site national study (N=645) evaluated the reliability of the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET) as a measure of the effectiveness of a simulated clinical experience (SCE).

Results: Findings from the pilot study resulted in a revision of the original 20-item evaluation tool to a 13-item 3-point ordinal scale instrument. Two subscales, “confidence” and “learning” were noted with Chronbach's alpha of .88 (confidence) and .87 (learning).

Conclusions: The calculated Chronbach's alpha (.93) from the multi-site investigation indicated that the 13-item SET is a reliable instrument and shows promise for measuring simulation effectiveness.

Original Publication Citation

Elfrink Cordi, V. L., Leighton, K., Ryan-Wenger, N., Doyle, T. J., & Ravert, P. (2012, July/August). History and development of the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET). Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8(6), e199-e210.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2012-02-06

Publisher

Clinical Simulation in Nursing

Language

English

College

Nursing

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

Included in

Other Nursing Commons

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