Title

Finding a Balance between Diversity and Target Language: A Case of a Japanese Language Program in a Private University

Keywords

Japanese language, native speaker, teacher training, diversity, standard language

Abstract

One of the challenges that language professionals face in our increasingly diverse communities is establishing a balance between diversity and language standards. While Standard Japanese can be considered a common language to interact with the majority of Japanese speakers who may not be accustomed to nonnative speech (ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines, 2012), the strict requirement to follow the monolingual standard may disregard the legitimacy of multilingual speakers, including nonstandard dialect speakers. This article discusses pros and cons of setting standards in language programs and relevant findings concerning the native speaker fallacy (Author, 2019). Then the author will share his shifting perspectives on errors, interlanguage, dialectal differences, and certain “nonstandard” practices (e.g. translanguaging) in his experience of training, hiring, and supervising teaching assistants at Brigham Young University.

Original Publication Citation

TSUCHIYA, Shinsuke. Finding a Balance between Diversity and Target Language: A Case of a Japanese Language Program in a Private University. Japanese Language and Literature, [S.l.], v. 54, n. 2, p. 327-336, sep. 2020. ISSN 2326-4586. Available at: .

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2020-9

Publisher

Japanese Language and Literature

Language

English

College

Humanities

Department

Asian and Near Eastern Languages

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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