Title

"Come Near unto Me": Guarded Space and Its Mediators in the Jerusalem Temple

Keywords

Israelites, temples, sacred space

Abstract

To the Israelites, the temple represented God’s presence on the earth and so stood as a singular symbol of his relationship with them. Therefore, the temple was one of the foundational institutions defining and establishing ancient Israelite culture and religion. Like most temples in the ancient world, the Israelite temple contained sacred space which was controlled and protected through the architectural features and arrangement of the temple, including the creation of borders. These borders clearly demarcated sacred from profane space, and passage through them was strictly controlled so that only those who were authorized could be admitted into God’s presence. The control of the sacred space demonstrated to the ancient worshippers at the temple that it was God’s house, and those who entered did so at his sufferance.

Original Publication Citation

"'Come Near Unto Me': Guarded Space and Its Mediators in the Jerusalem Temple," in Ascending the Mountain of the Lord: Temple, Praise, and Worship in the Old Testament: The 42nd Annual Brigham Young University Sidney B. Sperry Symposium. (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2013).

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2013

Publisher

The 42nd Annual Brigham Young University Sidney B. Sperry Symposium

Language

English

College

Religious Education

Department

Ancient Scripture

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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