Title

Family and School Capital Effects on Delinquency: Substitutes or Complements?

Keywords

delinquency, families, schools, social capital

Abstract

Studies imply that family and school resources indepen- dently affect delinquency. Yet research has not developed a conceptual or analytic framework for exploring how these variables may interact to affect delinquent behavior. The authors propose that certain family and school variables may serve as substitute or complementary forms of capital in equations designed to predict delinquency. In particular, school capital may substitute for low family capital to decrease involvement in delinquent behavior. Using data from the 1990 National Educational Longitudinal Study and the 1994–1995 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), the authors find that high-quality school environ- ments serve as substitutes for poor parental attachment and a lack of parental involvement in children’s schooling, especially among adolescents who experience low academic achievement or report a lack of academic val- ues. Hence, school-based social capital attenuates involvement in delin- quency partly by compensating for high-risk family environments.

Original Publication Citation

Hoffmann, John P., and Mikaela J. Dufur. 2008. “Family and School Capital Effects on Delinquency: Substitutes or Complements?” Sociological Perspectives 51(1): 29-62.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2008

Publisher

Sociological Perspectives

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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