Keywords

educational psychology, religion, devotion, psychological separation, religious orientation, mental health

Abstract

The relation between religious orientation and mental health was investigated. Measures of religious orientation and devoutness, depression, shame and guilt, existential well-being, and psychological separation from parents were administered to 268 undergraduate students. Four groups were formed. Results indicated that religiously devout intrinsic and proreligious Ss did not differ from less devout extrinsic and nontraditionally religious students in depression, shame, and existential well-being. Intrinsic and proreligious Ss scored higher on guilt proneness and religious well-being and lower on functional, attitudinal, and emotional separation from parents than did nontraditionally religious Ss. Ellis's (1980) religiosity-em otional-disturbance hypothesis was not supported. Some insight into how religion may have both benefits and costs for college students' personality functioning is provided. Implications for counseling are discussed.

Original Publication Citation

Richards, P.S. (1991). Religious devoutness in college students: Relations with emotional adjustment and psychological separation from parents. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 38, 189-196.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

1991

Publisher

Journal of Counseling Psychology

Language

English

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Department

Counseling Psychology and Special Education

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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