Title

Civil War’s Aftermath: Reconstruction, Abolition, and Polygamy

Keywords

Civil War, Changes from Civil War, Reconstruction of Society

Abstract

By late 1864, the physical fighting of the American Civil War was moving toward a final resolution. In December, General William T. Sherman (of “war is hell” fame) completed his infamous and devastating march to the sea in Georgia. In early April, the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, fell to Union forces. On April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee, commander of the army of Northern Virginia, surrendered his forces to Union general Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia—the rebellion more “worn out rather than suppressed,” as Union artillery colonel Charles Wainwright put it.[1] Though skirmishes would continue for some weeks, the war was essentially over.

Original Publication Citation

“Civil War’s Aftermath,” in Civil War Saints. Kenneth L. Alford, ed. (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center and Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company), pp. 295-315.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2012

Publisher

Religious Studies Center

Language

English

College

Religious Education

Department

Ancient Scripture

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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