Title

Geographically distant social networks elevate perceived preparedness for coastal environmental threats

Keywords

Social networks, Disaster, Preparedness, Resilience

Abstract

This study examines the effects of geographically differentiated social network support resources on perceived household preparedness and resource adequacy for coping with environmental hazards. The guiding notion is that socially close but spatially distant network resources will become critical for resilience in disaster contexts when the efficacy of local network resources become compromised due to community-wide disruption. Results from a random sample household survey of 928 coastal Louisiana residents confirm that perceived preparedness and resource adequacy for coping with environmental hazards is higher among those with strong support resources that are more than 2 h away from where they live, whereas access to support from local neighbors plays a lesser role. The implication is that efforts intended to build resilient communities by way of enhancing social network resources can benefit from considering the importance of promoting regional, in addition to localized, social ties.

Original Publication Citation

Cope, Michael R., Lee, Matthew R., Tim Slack, Troy C. Blanchard, Jeff Carney, Forbes Lipschitz, and Lydia Gikas. 2018. “Geographically Distant Social Networks Elevate Perceived Preparedness for Coastal Environmental Threats.” Population and Environment, 39(3): 277-296.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2017-12-27

Publisher

SpringerLink

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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