Keywords

religiosity, coping, psychological well-being and distress, Polynesians

Abstract

There is limited knowledge about coping and psychological adjustment in Latter-Day Saint (LDS) Polynesians. This study examined religiosity, collectivistic coping, and psychological well-being among 94 LDS Polynesians residing in the Midwest. As hypothesized, religiously committed LDS Polynesians were more likely to have a healthy psychological well-being and were also likely to use collectivistic coping styles, such that high helpfulness ratings on family support and religion-spirituality coping styles were significantly correlated with a positive psychological well-being. Family support also moderated the relationship between LDS Polynesians’ religious commitment and psychological well-being. Implications are discussed in terms of religiosity, culture, coping, and psychological well-being.

Original Publication Citation

Allen, G. E. K. & Heppner, P. P. (2011). Religiosity, coping, and psychological well-being among Latter-Day Saint Polynesians in the U.S. Asian American Journal of Psychology, 2, 1, 13-24.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2011

Language

English

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Department

Counseling Psychology and Special Education

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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