Keywords

Family Care, Uganda, absence of father, HIV/AIDS

Abstract

In this study, 162 HIV-positive mothers in Uganda were interviewed about the involvement of fathers and paternal kin, regarding current support they provide to children and as child placement options in the event of the mother’s death. More than half of the children had fathers who were already deceased. Another one third had fathers who were alive but did not live with the children. Only 16% of the children were living with and being supported by their fathers. Mothers indicated a strong preference for placement with maternal kin, in contrast to traditional expectations of paternal kin care. Patterns of change in kin care throughout Uganda and sub-Saharan Africa, and implications are discussed in the context of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Original Publication Citation

Roby, J.L., Shaw, S.A., Chemonges, E. W., & Hooley, C.D. (2009). Changing patterns of family care in Uganda: Father absence and patrilineal neglect in the face of HIV/AIDS. Families in Society, 90(1), 110-118.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2009

Publisher

The Journal of Contemporary Social Services

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Social Work

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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