Title

Drop out from primary to secondary school in Mexico: A life course perspective

Keywords

Dropout, Mexico, Educational transitions, Life course

Abstract

Preventing school dropout is a critical feature of the Millennium Development Goals. Yet, as primary school enrollments become universal, dropout rates in Mexico near 50% by the end of formal schooling. Using a unique, nationally representative data set (Mexico Family Life Survey) we track children ages 5–11 in 2002 to the years 2005–2006 to determine how many have students have dropped out of school. We then apply a life-course perspective to determine if the influences of family, school and macro-factors interact with the child's level of schooling and the transition from primary to secondary school. We find that the transition to secondary school has the highest dropout rates. Rurality matters most during this transition. As family factors are the most predictive indicator of dropout, the family's influence is dynamic over time—the role of mother's education fades while the influence of an unemployed father grows.

Original Publication Citation

Gibbs, Benjamin G., and Tim B. Heaton. “Drop Out from Primary to Secondary School in Mexico: A Life Course Perspective” International Journal of Educational Development 36: 63-71.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2014-5

Publisher

International Journal of Educational Development

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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