Title

Social inequality and children’s health in Africa: a cross sectional study

Keywords

Socioeconomic inequality, Children’s health, Africa

Abstract

Background

This study examines socioeconomic inequality in children’s health and factors that moderate this inequality. Socioeconomic measures include household wealth, maternal education and urban/rural area of residence. Moderating factors include reproductive behavior, access to health care, time, economic development, health expenditures and foreign aid.

Methods

Data are taken from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 2003 and 2012 in 26 African countries.

Results

Birth spacing, skilled birth attendants, economic development and greater per capita health expenditures benefit the children of disadvantaged mothers, but the wealthy benefit more from the services of a skilled birth attendant and from higher per capita expenditure on health.

Conclusion

Some health behavior and policy changeswould reduce social inequality, but the wealthy benefit more than the poor from provision of health services.

Original Publication Citation

Heaton, Tim B., Ben Crookston, Hayley Pierce, and Amoateng Acheampong. (2016) "Social Inequality and Children’s Health in Africa." Journal for Equity in Health,15:92

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2016-05-19

Publisher

International Journal for Equity in Health

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Assistant Professor

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