Title

How Economic Disadvantage Affects the Availability and Nature of Mentoring Relationships During the Transition to Adulthood

Keywords

Mentoring, Longitudinal, Poverty, Add Health

Abstract

Supportive nonparental adults, particularly nonfamilial adults, provide critical support during the transition to adulthood, opening doors to educational and career paths. This study examined whether economic disadvantage shapes access to these relationships. Results showed that low‐income adolescents had reduced access to naturally occurring mentors, and the relationships they did form tended to be close bonds with family and friends, rather than nonfamilial adults. Their mentors were more likely to focus on practical support, and less likely to serve as role models or provide career advice. These effects of socioeconomic status on natural mentoring relationships remained evident, even when accounting for youth race/ethnicity. Findings suggest that networks of support differ depending on a youth's socioeconomic context in ways that could perpetuate social and economic inequalities.

Original Publication Citation

Raposa, Elizabeth, Lance D. Erickson, Matthew Hagler, Jean Rhodes. (Forthcoming). “How Economic Disadvantage Affects the Availability and Nature of Mentoring Relationships During the Transition to Adulthood.” American Journal of Community Psychology. DOI: 10.1002/ajcp.12228.

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2018-02-05

Publisher

American Journal of Community Psychology

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology

University Standing at Time of Publication

Associate Professor

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