Title

Differences in Unit Cohesion and Combat-Related Mental Health Problems Based on Attachment Styles in US Military Veterans

Keywords

Veterans, Attachment, Unit cohesion, Military

Abstract

This study explored the differences in perceived unit cohesion, trauma symptoms, depression symptoms, and anxiety symptoms controlling for childhood trauma, based on attachment style in US military veterans. Previous studies have reported that higher levels of military unit cohesion, bonding through the social relationships between service members and their larger units, and secure attachment, are negatively associated with trauma symptoms, depression symptoms, and anxiety symptoms in veterans. This study examined mental health distress symptoms as well as military unit cohesion across attachment styles. Results suggest mean differences in trauma symptoms, depression symptoms, and anxiety symptoms across attachment styles. However, there was no difference in perceived unit cohesion across the four attachment styles. Those using fearful-avoidant attachment styles reported the highest mean trauma, depression, and anxiety symptoms followed by those using a dismissing-avoidant attachment style. Those using a secure attachment style reported the least mean trauma, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Implications for assessing and treating avoidant type attachment styles are discussed.

Original Publication Citation

Grady, J., Banford Witting, A., Kim, A., & Davis, S. (2017).Differences inUnit Cohesion and Combat-Related MentalHealth Problems Based on Attachment Styles in US Military Veterans.Contemporary Family Therapy. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-017-9444-8

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2017-10-03

Publisher

Contemporary Family Therapy

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Family Life

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

Share

COinS