Title

The relationship of perceived flexibility, supportive work–life policies, and use of formal flexible arrangements and occasional flexibility to employee engagement and expected retention

Keywords

workplace flexibility, flexible work arrangements, informal flexibility, employee engagement, retention, work–life support

Abstract

This study examines the relationship of perceived workplace flexibility and supportive work–life policies to employee engagement and expectations to remain with the organization (expected retention). It also explores the association of formal and occasional (informal) use of flexibility with these outcomes. Data are from a multi-organization database created by WFD Consulting of studies conducted between 1996 and 2006. Results revealed that perceived flexibility and supportive work–life policies were related to greater employee engagement and longer than expected retention. Employee engagement fully mediated the relationship between perceived flexibility and expected retention and partially mediated the relationship between supportive work–life policies and expected retention. Both formal and occasional use of flexibility were positively associated with perceived flexibility, employee engagement, and expected retention. These analyses provide evidence that workplace flexibility may enhance employee engagement, which may in turn lead to longer job tenure.

Original Publication Citation

Richman, A.L., Civian, J.T., Shannon, L.L., Hill, E.J., & Brennan, R.T. (2008). The relationship of perceived flexibility, supportive work-life policies, and use of formal flexible arrangements and occasional flexibility to employee engagement and expected retention. Community, Work, and Family, 11, 183-197. doi: 10.1080/13668800802050350

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2008-06-12

Publisher

Community, Work, and Family

Language

English

College

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Department

Family Life

University Standing at Time of Publication

Full Professor

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