Keywords

decolonization, Micronesia, Guam, Mormon, self-determination, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Pacific War, World War II

Abstract

Mormons, or members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, have a distinguished history of service in the U.S. government. During a forty-year period following World War II, Mormon politicians played vital roles in transitioning several islands in the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands from a quasi-colonial status into the self-governing Federated States of Micronesia. This article briefly traces the complicated transition through the public service of four key Mormon administrators: Elbert D. Thomas, John A. Carver Jr., Stewart L. Udall, and Morris K. Udall. They served respectively as first civilian high commissioner of the Trust Territory, Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Interior, and chair of the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee with oversight for the Pacific.

Original Publication Citation

Jensen, Devan. Micronesia's Coming of Age: The Mormon Role in Returning Micronesia to Self-Rule. Pacific Asia Inquiry 7, no. 1 (Fall 2016): 43–62

Document Type

Peer-Reviewed Article

Publication Date

2016-11-15

Permanent URL

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/4024

Publisher

University of Guam

Language

English

College

Religious Education

University Standing at Time of Publication

Administration

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