Abstract

This is a preliminary study investigating the effects of emotion on a confrontational naming task in people with aphasia (PWA). Previous research investigating the effects of emotion on various language tasks in PWA has produced mixed findings with some suggesting a facilitative effect and others an inhibitory effect. Participants included 9 adults with aphasia as the result of a stroke, resulting in the presence of word-finding deficits (i.e., anomia). Participants named images in positive, negative, and neutral conditions. Responses were scored as either correct or incorrect; incorrect responses were coded further to illustrate individual error patterns. The majority of participants demonstrated a decrease in naming accuracy in the negative condition compared to the preceding and subsequent neutral conditions. The results of this study suggest that negative emotional arousal may cause PWA to devote attentional resources to emotional regulation and away from the linguistic task, thus interfering with language performance. Further research is needed to support these preliminary findings.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-06-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11776

Keywords

aphasia, confrontational naming, accuracy, emotion, arousal, valence

Language

english

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