Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of emotional arousal and valence on linguistic processing of adults with aphasia and neurotypical young adults. Nine people with aphasia (at least 6 months left hemisphere stroke and presenting with word retrieval deficits) and 20 young adults (reporting no evidence of neurological injury) participated. All participants completed a confrontational naming task during three conditions that were manipulated according to emotional arousal and valence: positive (high arousal, positive valence), negative (high arousal, negative valence), and neutral (low arousal, neutral valence). Average response time was measured for pictures named accurately within each condition. In general, participants with aphasia named pictures more slowly than young adult participants. Neither participant group had significant differences in response time across conditions. Individual participants varied in how emotional valence affected their response times. Further research is needed to identify what factors lead to differing responses to the high-arousal conditions.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Communication Disorders

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-06-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11726

Keywords

aphasia, response time, rehabilitation, naming, valence, arousal patterns

Language

english

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