Abstract

Traditional teaching practices in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses have failed to support student success, causing many students to leave STEM fields and disproportionately affecting women and students of color. Although much is known about effective STEM teaching practices, many faculty continue to adhere to traditional methods, such as lecture. In this study, we investigated the factors that affect STEM faculty members' instructional decisions about evidence-based instructional practices (EBIPs). We performed a qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with faculty members from the Colleges of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Life Sciences, and Engineering who took part in the STEM Faculty Institute (STEMFI) professional development program at the university. We also observed the participants' teaching behaviors using the Classroom Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM (COPUS) and investigated the relationship between faculty teaching behaviors and the individual, social, and contextual factors identified from the interview data. We found that internal factors, including attitudes and self-efficacy, were significantly correlated with student-centered teaching behaviors, while social and contextual factors were not significantly correlated with teaching behaviors. This result suggests that in addition to promoting positive teaching cultures and reducing barriers, efforts to support faculty change should emphasize changing faculty attitudes.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Educational Inquiry, Measurement, and Evaluation

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2019-12-10

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11704

Keywords

faculty development, higher education, educational change, evidence-based practice, STEM education

Language

english

Included in

Education Commons

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