Abstract

PURPOSE: This study comparted arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) between the dominant and nondominant legs and the relationship between blood flow and occlusion pressure at rest and during muscle contractions in males and females. METHODS: The AOP of the SFA was measured using Doppler ultrasound in the dominant and nondominant legs of 35 (16 males, 19 females) apparently healthy, normotensive young adults. Blood flow in the SFA was measured in the resting state (REST) and during plantar flexion exercise (EXC) at occlusion pressures ranging from 0% to 100% of AOP. ANOVA was used to compare AOP between the dominant and nondominant legs and between males and females. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of relevant variables on AOP. A mixed model was used to evaluate the relationship between blood flow and occlusion pressure at REST and during EXC. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the AOP between the dominant and nondominant legs in males (230 ± 41 vs 209 ± 37 mmHg) and females (191 ± 27 vs 178 ± 21 mmHg), respectively. There was also a significant sex difference in the AOP in the dominant (230 ± 41 vs 191 ± 27 mmHg; p = 0.002) and nondominant (209 ± 37 vs 178 ± 21 mmHg; p = 0.004) legs, respectively. Regression analysis revealed that after accounting for leg circumference, age, sex, blood pressure, and skinfold thickness were not independent predictors of AOP. At REST and during EXC, there was a linear relationship between relative blood flow and occlusion pressure. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in leg circumference contribute to a portion of the differences in AOP between the dominant and nondominant legs and between sexes. The linear relationship between relative blood flow and occlusion pressure suggests that occlusion pressures during blood flow restriction exercise should be chosen carefully. A large variance in blood flow measurements at different occlusion pressures suggests the need for evaluating the reliability of blood flow measurements and standardization of methods.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Exercise Sciences

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-05-20

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11642

Keywords

blood flow restriction, arterial flow, arterial occlusion pressure, exercise

Language

english

Included in

Life Sciences Commons

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