Abstract

Heart rate variability as a measure of cardiovascular health and autonomic activity correlates with psychological resiliency but is not consistently related to trait extraversion, a strong predictor of emotional well-being. This study intends to clarify research findings about trait extraversion and heart rate variability by identifying the context and nature of the relationship between extraversion and physiological responses. As a secondary analysis of data from a study comparing biofeedback and compassionate breathing, extraversion scores were compared with heart rate variability data at three different points including prior to a stressor, during exposure to a stressor, and recovery to a stressor to determine the influence of extraversion on stress reactivity and stress recovery. In our sample population of 80 participants who were mostly young and in good health determined by self-report, the average extraversion score 79.14. Linear regression was used to compare differences at each time point and data was analyzed for significance at p=.05; a post-hoc power analysis revealed β = .81, 1 – β. There were no significant findings between extraversion and heart rate variability at any time point. The results of this study support no relationship between extraversion, health, and stress-resiliency.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Psychology

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2021-05-21

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11640

Keywords

heart rate variability, extraversion, stress reactivity

Language

english

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