Abstract

This dissertation examines the role that culinary entrepreneurship communities of practice, using Lave and Wenger's Legitimate Peripheral Participation (LPP) model (Lave & Wenger, 1991), can lead to better social and economic inclusion for Middle Eastern Muslim refugee chefs in Utah. The life history approach was used to construct life histories for two Middle Eastern Muslim refugee chefs in Utah who joined the Spice Kitchen Incubator (SKI) program. SKI is a community of practice funded by the International Rescue Committee to assist refugee chefs in the resettlement process. This was an exploratory study, and given the limited number of cases reviewed, the conclusions cannot be generalized. However, this study concludes that SKI, as a community of practice, despite the many difficulties faced by refugee programs in the period 2016-2018 (the study period), had a positive impact on the social and economic inclusion outcomes for the participants.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2021-04-09

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11619

Keywords

situated learning, legitimate peripheral participation, adult education, adult refugees, life history, entrepreneurship education

Language

english

Included in

Education Commons

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