Abstract

This thesis is part of a larger series of studies being conducted by Kristine Tanner, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University (BYU). The larger project is funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders at the National Institutes of Health. This thesis primarily investigated the effects of combination inhaled corticosteroids (ICs) on aerodynamic measures of the voice. In recent years, an increase in the localized laryngeal side effects from IC treatment, including dysphonia, have been reported. This study employed a between-groups experimental design, with two groups of rabbit larynges having been exposed to either ICs or nebulized isotonic saline two times each day for eight weeks at The University of Utah. For this study, the independent variable is group condition (i.e., IC versus saline) and the dependent variables are two aerodynamic measurements made at the onset of phonation using a benchtop experimental setup, namely phonation threshold pressure (PTP; cmH2O) and phonation threshold flow (PTF; L/min). The results of this study indicate a significant difference in PTP and PTF between vocal folds treated with IC as compared to vocal folds treated with nebulized isotonic saline solution. Implications of this study suggest negative changes in the voice due to IC treatment.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2021-04-08

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11576

Keywords

phonation threshold pressure (PTP), phonation threshold flow (PTF), inhaled corticosteroids, rabbit phonation, benchtop model, asthma

Language

english

Included in

Education Commons

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