Abstract

Minority groups are at a disadvantage when seeking psychological treatment. Interventions are often less effective for minority populations when treatment outcomes are compared to Anglo populations. Studies indicate that the stigma associated with mental health disorders and seeking psychological intervention within these minority subgroups may be at fault for this disparity. In this study, we explored this idea by examining what methods of intervention Hispanic-identified individuals are more likely to seek out. Participants were given the option to enlist in a biofeedback approach to intervention as well as a supportive talk psychotherapy. Participants were drawn from the community population in Utah County via Mountainlands Community Health Center. Before taking part in the study, they were asked to indicate their cultural identity based on a series of criteria as well as their perceived stigma associated with mental health interventions. Lastly, participants completed exit interviews to quantitatively explore their reasoning for choosing the treatment approach they did, what they liked about their approach, and why they did not choose the other approach. The data collected was analyzed using a modified approach to consensual qualitative research methods.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-12-09

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11506

Keywords

Keywords: Biofeedback, minority populations, cultural identity, qualitative research

Language

english

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