Abstract

The majority of research on the mathematics teaching and learning of students with mathematics learning dis/abilities is not performed in the field of mathematics education, but in the field of special education. Due to this theoretical divide, students with mathematics learning dis/abilities are far more likely to be in classes that emphasize memorization, direct instruction, and the explicit teaching of rules and procedures. Additionally, students with mathematics learning dis/abilities are often seen as "unable" to succeed in school mathematics and are characterized by their academic difficulties and deficits. The negative assumptions, beliefs, and expectations resulting from ableistic practices in the education system color the interactions educators, parents, and other students have with students with mathematics learning dis/abilities. These interactions in turn influence how students with mathematics learning dis/abilities view and position themselves as learners and doers of mathematics. My study builds on the theoretical framework of positioning theory (Harré, 2012) in order to better understand the mathematical identities of students with mathematics learning dis/abilities. The results of my study show how these students use their prepositions and enduring positions to inform the in-the-moment positions they take on in the mathematics classroom.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-06-16

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11278

Keywords

identity, positioning theory, mathematics learning disability, dyscalculia

Language

english

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