Abstract

Journalism plays an important role in our society. But what happens when a journalist decides to pursue a new profession? The loss of a journalist from a newsroom can have a significant impact, particularly when that journalist takes with them institutional knowledge and a history of the market. This study uses qualitative interviews with 12 former broadcast journalists to investigate what factors cause them to leave the field and what the implications are for the industry. Relying on burnout theory as a framework, this study reveals three key reasons broadcast journalists decided to walk away. First, they faced increasing demands including long or unconventional work hours, a tenuous work-life balance, difficult stories to cover, and doing more with fewer resources. Second, they endured difficult issues with management including unfulfilled promises, the increasing commercialization of news, unrealistic and unethical expectations, the consolidation of the industry, and a lack of appreciation. Third, they felt they were not adequately compensated. This study recommends more support and professional development for broadcast journalists, more cross-training opportunities, and improved financial compensation.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-05-21

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11217

Keywords

journalism, broadcast news, demands, management, compensation

Language

English

Included in

Fine Arts Commons

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