Abstract

A deep visual analysis of Ludovico Carracci’s 1588 Madonna and Child, Angels, and Saints Francis, Dominic, Mary Magdalene and the Donor Cecilia Bargellini Boncompagni with an emphasis on the role of the patron, the significance of the locality, and the visual semiotics of the Virgin Mary’s gaze in prompting conversion in the repentant prostitutes of the Carmelite convertite convent associated with Ss. Filippo and Giacomo in Bologna, Italy. Including a commentary on contemporary social expectations of modest behavior and the painting’s deliberate incorporation of inappropriate female behavior towards a religious purpose. A discussion of uniquely Carmelite iconography, the use of Ignatian mental prayer in convents, and self-determination in imagery by a Bolognese aristocratic woman.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities

Rights

https://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2020-04-09

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11168

Keywords

The Bargellini Madonna, Ludovico Carracci, Donna Cecilia Bargellini Boncompagni, Bologna, convertite, Carmelite, Madonna and Child, Virgin Mary, sixteenth-century Italy, prostitute, Mary Magdalene, social reform, discalced, sacra conversazione, patronage, Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius, mental prayer, laude, St. Martha, enthroned Madonna, Madonna di San Luca, mendicant, scapular, Marian devotion, convent, Caterina de Vigri, gaze, lute, convent music, reception, performativity

Language

English

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