Abstract

The scientific community has employed multiple methods to analyze and describe the jet noise emanating from the turbulent exhaust flow from modern military aircraft engines, with the goal that better characterization of the sound radiation will improve noise reduction efforts. This thesis utilizes three different approaches to characterize the noise source region from a static F-22A Raptor. First, the energy flow field along planes near the aircraft and along an arc is measured using a multidimensional vector intensity probe. The resulting vector intensity maps give a clear indication of the directionality of the noise as a function of frequency at different engine conditions. A straightforward ray-tracing method show the utility of vector intensity measurements in source characterization by estimating the region from which the loudest portions of sound are emanating. Second, intensity reconstructions from near-field acoustical holography (NAH) provide an estimate of the three-dimensional radiated energy flow field. The sound field is shown to be dominated by mutually incoherent radiation lobes, which can be partially isolated by a partial decomposition method. Lastly, a wavepacket source model is optimized in light of amplitude-based NAH reconstructions near the jet axis. The wavepacket model successfully fits the NAH-reconstructed partial fields, especially at frequencies above 50 Hz, indicating that the source may be modeled by multiple wave packets at each frequency.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Physics and Astronomy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-07-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd11072

Keywords

vector intensity, jet noise, acoustical holography

Language

English

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