Abstract

A study area on the southern extensions of the Great Basin cold desert (Kaiparowits Basin, Utah) was selected which has had varying amounts of disturbance. Areas with similar slope and exposure in the Shadscale community were sampled. At each site, soil samples were collected and percent sand, percent clay, percent silt, soluble salts, and hydrogen ion concentrations were measured. Cluster analysis based on percent frequency of the perennial species showed that eight groups or sub-communities were definable within the area sampled. Patterns within the vegetation were shown to be independent with the use of cluster analysis. Discriminant analysis on soil factor patterns associated with the groups were shown to be non-correlated with the vegetation patterns. Gradient analyses were therefore conducted with edaphic factors in relationship to the 11 most prominent perennial species. Distinct trends were shown to exist for nine of the 11 species. Evaluation of grazing on the 14 most-prevalent species indicate that grazing affects all species studied, under moderate to heavy stocking rates.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1977-03-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd366

Keywords

Plant communities, Utah

Language

English

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