Abstract

Three species or varieties of chokecherry reportedly grow in North America. Data were collected to determine if the varieties could be distinguished by morphological characteristics of the seedling. Seeds, collected from 20 locations in North America, were grown in a greenhouse where gross environmental factors could be controlled. For two growing seasons, data were collected on (1) height, (2) leaf thickness, (3) rate of root growth, (4) number of teeth, (5) number of leaves, and (6) the ratio of leaf length to width. The resulting data were subjected to analysis of variance and group means, and correlation studies. For the most part morphological variations within population were greater than the variation between populations. Where significant differences did exist between populations, patterns could not be determined; consequently, it was not possible to distinguish varieties of chokecherry seedlings by those morphological characteristics observed in this study. It was concluded that there is only one species of chokecherry in North America with numerous local variations or biotypes.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1972-05-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd365

Keywords

Cherry

Language

English

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