Abstract

A total of 28 burn areas, that varied in age from 3-100+- years, were analyzed in a study of succession following fire, in the pin yon-juniper woodlands of west central Utah. Data were collected by means of the line-point and quadrat methods. These data were subjected to a multiple regression analysis. Canopy cover, basal area (sq. ft./acre) and density (trees/acre) of juniper were highly correlated with age of burn. Percentage dead sagebrush was found to be positively correlated with density of junipers. The stages of succession following fire began with weedy annuals, that reached a peak within 3-4 years. Juniper woodlands are well developed 85-90 years following fire. Intermediate stages of succession varied, but followed a general pattern of perennial grasses, perennial grasses-shrubs and perennial grasses-shrubs-trees. Tree height and stem diameter are positively correlated with age of Utah juniper. Thirty-three years is the average minimum age at which Utah juniper produce seed.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1972-05-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd353

Keywords

Plant succession; Plant ecology; Botany, Utah

Language

English

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