Abstract

Activity curves for Dipodomys ordii were developed from data obtained from a study utilizing an electrically monitored trapping grid. The curves for non-perturbated populations showed an initial post-dusk peak, followed by increasing activity and a large pre-dawn peak; but after ten dominant animals had been removed, the largest activity peak was post-dusk. Differences in activity patterns were not found among sex, age or reproductive classes. Rising ambient temperatures, falling barometric pressures, winds over 3.2 km/hr and the absence of the moon depressed capture numbers; while increasing humidity (relative and absolute), decreasing soil temperatures at 20 and 40 cm below ground level, rising barometric pressures, winds under 3.2 km/hr and clear periods with moonlight increased capture numbers; but only cloudy periods significantly altered the shape of the curves. Low statistical correlation indicated that other independent environmental variables, in addition to those considered, determined the observed activity patterns. Visual observations did not differ significantly from trap results.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1974-11-21

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd175

Keywords

Kangaroo rats; Radiation; Physiological effect

Language

English

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