Abstract

Approximately 475 acres of aspen, oak brush, and grass-forb-shrub communities were treated with herbicides. The populations of arthropods, birds, and mammals were investigated on treated and untreated areas and the results were compared. There was no difference between soil arthropod populations on treated and untreated aspen plots but a significant increase in these populations on treated meadow plots. The foliage insect populations were significantly lower on the treated aspen plots but were significantly higher on the treated meadow plots. The aquatic invertebrates were not affected by the treatments. Bird populations ware lower in the treated area during the nesting season (June), higher in the treated area during July and August and nearly the same in each area during September. Small mammal populations decreased significantly on the treated meadow plots. Microtus populations increased while all other small mammals decreased in numbers on treated aspen plots. Use of the treated areas by mule deer was significantly reduced, while use of the same areas by elk was slightly increased.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1970-08-01

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd325

Keywords

Herbicides; Animal populations; Animal ecology, Utah; Ecology, Utah

Language

English

Share

COinS