Abstract

Bald Eagles on Amchitka Island, Alaska, were studied from 1969-1972. From 1970-1972 the population averaged 214.6 eagles. The average ration was 66% adults to 34% subadults. The eagles move to and from the island in relation to significant food sources (especially the garbage dump). An increase in active nests occurred from 1969-1972 due to an increase in food. The average percentage of nests containing young from 1970-1972 was 71.28%. During these three years, the average number of young known in a nest per nesting attempt was 1.24, and the average number of young known in a nest per nest containing young was 1.75. In 1972, .86 young fledged per nesting attempt, and 1.42 young fledged per nest fledging young. Prey remains from 1971-1972 averaged 23% mammalian, 61% avian, 14% fish, and 1% invertebrate as calculated by numbers. Bald Eagles were found to regularly prey on sea otter pups.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1974-08-08

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd290

Keywords

Bald eagle; Birds, Alaska, Amchikta Island

Language

English

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