Abstract

Three desert Artemisia tridentata communities in Rush Valley, Utah were trapped for small rodents during the summer of 1970 in a mark-recapture study. Population densities were estimated using several indices for each population category. Animals were weighed and rodent biomass calculated for each species throughout the summer. Populations, biomass, and other data were then analyzed to gain a better understanding of A. tridentata community types of the Great Basin. Peromyscus maniculatus, Eutamias minimus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis were common to area 1. Peromyscus maniculatus, E. minimus, and Perognathus parvus were common to areas 2 and 3. The peak estimated standing crops were 182.8, 143.1, and 129.7 g/acre for areas 2, 1, and 3 respectively. The population and biomass of area 2 peaked in mid-summer, area 1 in early summer, and area 3 in late summer. Results from a similar study indicate mountain A. tridentata communities may be less productive, in terms of rodent biomass, than desert A. tridentata communities at lower elevations.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1972-02-17

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd258

Keywords

Rodents, Utah; Ecology, Utah; Rush Valley, Utah

Language

English

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