Abstract

Although many studies have been published detailing the effects of narratives on persuasion, no literature has been published on the impact of narratives on psychological reactance in the context of anti-pornography campaigns. This study expands on prior narrative research by measuring adults' aged 21-76 (N=187) level of psychological reactance to statistical, research-based, and narrative videos. The study also explored Intrinsic Religious Motivation and perceived threat and susceptibility as factors. No significant relationship between narratives and reduced psychological reactance was found, however, findings indicated that viewing anti-pornography narratives caused individuals to view the threat of pornography as being more severe while simultaneously considering themselves less susceptible to the threat. This suggests the presence of optimistic bias. The study's findings also suggested that having strong beliefs is connected to a having greater perceived threat and susceptibility to pornography addiction.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Communications

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2018-11-01

Document Type

Thesis

Keywords

psychological reactance, communications, persuasion, pornography, media effects, health communication, narratives

Language

english

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