Abstract

The effects of human relations training on 222 students in organizational behavior labs were measured in this study. Eighty students were randomly assigned to one of four sections taught by the same instructor--two traditional sections and two stewardship sections-in a Solomon Four-Group Experimental Design. The two stewardship sections used individualized goal selection and accountability procedures with discussions and readings incorporating religious principles. Four data-gathering instruments were used to measure the social, emotional, and moral development of the students . A one-way analysis of variance on pre- and posttest questionnaires from all 222 students showed no significant differences among any of the groups. Posttreatment observation ratings, class ratings, and student interviews from the 80 students in the traditional and stewardship sections showed some significant, but slight gains for the stewardship sections. The results of the comparison between traditional and stewardship methods were probably not generally significant because stewardship principles were not rigorously applied. Another study using tighter methodology to integrate instructional procedures with religious and human relations principles was recommended.

Degree

DRE

College and Department

Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright

Date Submitted

1976-08-01

Document Type

Thesis

Keywords

human relations training, religious education

Language

English

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