Abstract

Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptable tissue that comprises approximately 40% of total body weight while accounting for up to 90% of whole-body oxygen consumption and energy expenditure during exercise. The loss of skeletal muscle protein and subsequent decrease in muscle mass (atrophy) that accompanies disuse results primarily from a decrease in intracellular protein synthesis combined with an increase in proteolytic activity. Interestingly, these processes of skeletal muscle atrophy are amplified by changes in mitochondrial capacity, with evidence suggesting that the maintenance of mitochondria during periods of disuse protects skeletal muscle against atrophy. Remarkably, rodents with denervated muscle are protected against muscle atrophy following whole-body heat stress. The mechanism of protection appears to be tied to the observed increases in heat shock protein (HSP) and PGC-1α, which accompany the heat stress. Without any published observations as to whether such heat-induced protection against muscle atrophy would translate to human muscle, the aim of this project was to determine the extent to which deep tissue heating (via pulsed shortwave diathermy) might provide protection against skeletal muscle atrophy.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2018-07-01

Document Type

Dissertation

Keywords

muscle atrophy, human skeletal muscle, immobilization, heat stress, heat shock, mitochondrial respiration

Language

english

Included in

Life Sciences Commons

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