Abstract

Current research studies on the success of peer-based outreach programs for adolescent suicide prevention are inconclusive (Mann et al. 2005; Gould et al. 2003). Fewer still have measured the feelings and experiences of the peers who are responsible for reaching out to suicidal friends within such a program. This exploratory research study examines the experiences and perspectives of past participants of an adolescent peer-based outreach program, Hope4Utah. Findings from this mixed-method study of Hope4Utah support that peer-outreach suicide prevention programs have far-reaching benefits, on both the participants and their surrounding communities, which extend into adulthood. Themes that emerged from analysis of interviews are consistent with literature on school communities, adolescent alienation, stigma reduction, compassion fatigue, and formation of social roles and mental health beliefs through the social interactionist framework. Finally, this paper explores promising avenues for future research.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2018-07-01

Document Type

Thesis

Keywords

adolescent suicide, mental health, long-term impact, peer-based outreach program, school communities, adolescent alienation, compassion fatigue, stigma reduction, social interactionism

Language

english

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