Abstract

The atomization of a liquid by an air stream has been an item of much concern in the past, and there have been numerous experimental studies of the process made in an effort to correlate liquid and air- stream physical properties into a general model which will predict the degree of and the time required for atomization for a given physical situation. The breakup of liquid drops, a major portion of the atomization process, finds application in the field of meteorology, where the formation, breakup, and shape of raindrops is an item of much concern; in the field of internal combustion engines, where the carburization of a fuel is of major importance; in the industrial field, where the atomization of paint and plant insecticides and spray drying processes are oft-mentioned objects of concern; in the chemical industries, where the emulsification of liquid- liquid systems, the formation of froths, the production of aerosols, and dispersion processes in general are most important considerations; and in the science of rheology, wherein the motion and dispersion of liquids, gases, and solids must take into consideration various breakup mechanisms. Despite the oft-mentioned importance of such liquid atomization processes, there has been little theoretical work done in .an effort to mathematically correlate the important variables and parameters common to all breakup and dispersion processes in general.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Mechanical Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright

Date Submitted

1965-7

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/Letd26

Keywords

Shock waves, Fluid dynamics, Impact, Aluminum — Testing

Language

English

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