Title

Zion's Camp

Abstract

In 1831, Jackson County, Missouri, was designated as a place of refuge for the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Attempts to establish permanent residence in their Zion ended in bloodshed and violence. An army was raised to go to the aid of those cast out of their homes. This thesis pays particular attention to the recruiting of the army and the gathering of money and provisions, the trek to Missouri, and the interaction of those promoting and opposing the camp.

The trek from Kirtland, Ohio, to Jackson County, Missouri, revealed frustrations, hardships, strengths, weaknesses, and deaths among those who participated in the abortive attempt to redeem the land and reinstate the people. This study also disclosed contrasting reactions of historians to this period of history and the still differing feelings of many who wrote of their personal experience with the camp.

The histories of over two hundred men who comprised this trek were studied to determine its impact upon their lives. A strong loyal tie between them and their prophet leader was discovered.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1973

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm708

Keywords

Zion's Camp, Expedition, 1834, Mormon Church, History, 1820-1844, Missouri

Language

English

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