Abstract

Purpose: Health literacy and obesity are major global issues. Vulnerable populations, such as those with low health literacy, have the highest rates of obesity. Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) nations have the highest prevalence of obesity in the world. This study describes the relationship between health literacy and demographic variables in a sample of NHOPI caregiving adults. Methods: We conducted a correlational study of 364 NHOPI adults. Each was a caregiver of at least one NHOPI child. Data were collected at grocery stores and a preschool in two Hawaiian Islands (n=209) and at NHOPI events in Utah (n=155). Our questionnaire included demographics, the Newest Vital Sign, and questions about caregivers' food-serving and activity promotion. Results: 45% of the sample had limited health literacy. There was no significant difference between participants' health literacy in Hawaii and Utah. Other demographic variables (gender, age, income, BMI, and education) had a significant relationship with health literacy. Conclusions: Many NHOPIs have limited health literacy. This is concerning as limited health literacy can reduce an adults' ability to use health-related materials including nutrition facts labels.Implications for Practice: Health care providers should not assume NHOPIs understand nutrition facts labels. Instruction on nutrition facts labels should be available in schools and communities. Future research should examine effective interventions for this population.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Nursing

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-07-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5493

Keywords

health literacy, Pacific Islander, BMI, obesity, demographics, gender, age, ethnicity, income, newest vital sign, nutrition label, prevention

Language

English

Included in

Nursing Commons

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