Keywords

mathematical programming, multi-agent system, water shadow price, reservoir, decision support

Start Date

1-7-2010 12:00 AM

Description

One key advantage of agent-based modeling (ABM) is the one-to-onecorrespondence of real-world and computational agents, which facilitates participatorysimulation and model-enhanced learning. Using ABM effectively poses a number ofchallenges that have not been fully resolved yet. Some of these challenges relate toorganizational and institutional factors, such as finding an appropriate boundaryarrangement in which scientists, policy makers and stakeholders can interact and jointlymake use of the models. Other challenges relate to technical and economic factors, as themodels must ensure continuous stakeholder involvement and actually provide some returnsto end-users. This research tested computer-based decision tools in a knowledge brokerarrangement. We applied the MP-MAS software to simulate how farmers interact with eachother and react to changes in their economic and natural environment. In particular, weused the model for evaluating the willingness-to-pay for the construction of a newreservoir. A key innovation of the research was the development of the decision-supporttools in close interaction with multiple stakeholders, including water user associations andmembers of the irrigation and agricultural administration. This interaction, which wasorganized in the form of individual consultations, workshops and training sessions, ensuredthat the simulations addressed the needs and priorities of different stakeholders and tooktheir local knowledge into account.

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Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Knowledge-Brokering with Agent-Based Models: Some Experiences from Irrigation- Related Research in Chile

One key advantage of agent-based modeling (ABM) is the one-to-onecorrespondence of real-world and computational agents, which facilitates participatorysimulation and model-enhanced learning. Using ABM effectively poses a number ofchallenges that have not been fully resolved yet. Some of these challenges relate toorganizational and institutional factors, such as finding an appropriate boundaryarrangement in which scientists, policy makers and stakeholders can interact and jointlymake use of the models. Other challenges relate to technical and economic factors, as themodels must ensure continuous stakeholder involvement and actually provide some returnsto end-users. This research tested computer-based decision tools in a knowledge brokerarrangement. We applied the MP-MAS software to simulate how farmers interact with eachother and react to changes in their economic and natural environment. In particular, weused the model for evaluating the willingness-to-pay for the construction of a newreservoir. A key innovation of the research was the development of the decision-supporttools in close interaction with multiple stakeholders, including water user associations andmembers of the irrigation and agricultural administration. This interaction, which wasorganized in the form of individual consultations, workshops and training sessions, ensuredthat the simulations addressed the needs and priorities of different stakeholders and tooktheir local knowledge into account.