Keywords

multicultural counseling, theory, ethics, research, measurement, clinical practice, assessment, therapy, social advocacy, research design

Abstract

Are mental health interventions that are intentionally made congruent with clients’ cultural contexts more effective than traditional practices? If a large body of empirical data supports an affirmative response to this question, then multiculturalism may be deemed not only legitimate within but integral (primary) to mental health interventions. However, if the data are inconclusive or deemed inadequate, then multiculturalism will remain marginalized (secondary) as an egalitarian ideal, possibly worthy of public praise but privately labeled as “impractical” or worse. All other things being equal, empirical evidence should determine which path will be taken; this chapter will attempt to provide direction.

Original Publication Citation

Smith, T. B. (2010). Culturally congruent practices in counseling and psychotherapy: A review of research. In J. G. Ponterotto, J. M. Casas, L. A. Suzuki, & C. M. Alexander (Eds.), Handbook of multicultural counseling. (3rd ed., pp. 439-450). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2013-01-14

Publisher

Sage Publications

Language

English

College

David O. McKay School of Education

Department

Counseling Psychology and Special Education

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