Abstract

Various configurations of unidirectional carbon/epoxy composite rods were impacted radially, inspected using micro-CT scanning equipment, and tested in axial compression to measure the residual strength after impact. This data was used to correlate the relationship between impact energy, residual strength, and the peak crack area and total crack volume along the length of the specimens. These specimens represent local members of open three-dimensional composite lattice structures (e.g., based on isogrid or IsoTruss® geometries) that are continuously fabricated using advanced three-dimensional braiding techniques. The specimens were radially impacted with 2.5 J (1.9 ft-lbs), 5.0 J (3.7 ft-lbs), 7.5 J (5.6 ft-lbs), 10 J (7.4 ft-lb), 15 J (11 ft-lbs), and 20 J (15 ft-lbs) of energy, and compared to undamaged control specimens. The unidirectional core specimens were 8 mm (5/16") in diameter and were consolidated with various sleeve configurations and materials. Sleeves differed in types (bi-directional braided sleeves or unidirectional spiral wraps), nominal sleeve coverage of the core fibers (full or half), and sleeve material (Nomex Thread or Dunstone Hi-Shrink Tape). The unsupported length of the specimens used in this research was 50.8 mm (2") to ensure a strength-controlled compression failure rather than a failure due to buckling. After impact, the specimens were scanned using a micro-CT scanner at resolutions of 50 and 35 microns and subsequently tested in axial compression. The micro-CT scan images were analyzed to measure the crack areas along the specimen. From this analysis, the peak crack area and total crack volume along the length of the specimen was calculated. Similar to past research, as the impact energy increases, the residual compression-strength-after-impact decreases. As the impact energy increases, specimens with shrink tape sleeves had the largest increase in peak crack area and overall crack volume while specimens with full spiral sleeves had the lowest increase in peak crack area and overall crack volume. A bimodal increase is evident in the peak crack area and total crack volume over the length of the specimen where specimens impacted at 15 J (11 ft-lbs) showed the highest peak crack area across all sleeve types. There is a slight correlation between the increase in peak crack area and overall crack volume and the decrease in residual compression strength after impact. Shrink Tape, while yielding a higher quality specimen with greater compression strength prior to impact, did not protect the specimens against damage due to impact as well as other sleeve types. This was shown by the large decrease in residual compression strength after impact and increase in peak crack area and overall crack volume as the impact energy increased.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2016-05-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd8540

Keywords

Micro-CT, carbon/epoxy, impact, residual strength, NDI

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